Computer aided design software is used to produce accurate drawings and product specifications. It is an essential part of the design process of all kinds of products as it helps to estimate the quantity of materials required, eliminating waste and saving on costs. CAD software is used in virtually every industry including architecture, mechanics and engineering. It is also innovatively used in industries you perhaps would not expect. In this article we will talk you through the benefits of computer aided design software and how it is used by the film, fashion and prosthetic design industries.

Animators use CAD software to create their characters

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Animation

Computer aided design software is used in the production of computer animations for special effects in films and advertising. Many of the animated characters you see on the big screen will have been created using CAD software. Digital illustrators use electronic graphic tablets to draw their designs onto the computer, using CAD software and various animation plugins to bring them to life. CAD has enabled animations to look so life-like that audiences can barely identify what is real and what is not when they are at the cinema.

Fashion design

Many fashion designers use computer aided design software to help bring their designs to life. CAD provides accurate measurements which can be interpreted by the manufacturers, when the designs are put into production. CAD software quickens up the design process and cuts down on prototype costs as it tells designers exactly how much material they will require to make a particular item of clothing. CAD software also increases accuracy and cuts down on waste as designers can see if their designs are practical before physically making them.

Jewellery design

CAD also plays an important role in jewellery design. Many companies have their own CAD designers who bring their paper drawings to life and guide them through the manufacturing process.

CAD is a fantastic innovation for designers of bespoke jewellery, as it allows them to give their customers a good idea of what their commissioned piece will look like, before it has actually been made. It is much easier for revisions to be made digitally, if the customer is not completely happy with the design. Les face it if you are commissioning an expensive diamond ring you want to make sure it is exactly how you pictured it in your head! Bespoke jewellery designers using CAD software achieve higher customer satisfaction as their clients have felt included and valued in the design process.

CAD software is used in many different industries from engineering to fashion design

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Prosthetics

State of the art CAD software is used to create prosthetic devices for amputees. Practitioners simply have to use a laser scanning camera to get a 3D shape of their patient’s limb. These cameras capture an exact digital image of the shape and size of the limb. Images are then sent to the CAD software where a diagnostic socket is first created for an amputees test fitting.

Using CAD speeds up the process of prosthetic design and increases the accuracy of the fit, improving patient care. Practitioners can spend less time designing the prosthetic devices and more time educating their patients and helping them with their rehabilitation.

Conclusion

Although people usually associate computer aided design software with architecture it has so many other innovative uses, e.g. kitchen design software Articad.com. It has revolutionised the way products are designed, enabling users to get a good idea of what their design will look like and how it will work before they have even physically made it. Computer aided design software has also enabled companies to cut down costs spent on prototyping as the accurate measurements and details  it provides makes it easier to get the manufacturing of a product right the first time.

By Megan Hunt

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